Don’t be fiddled by the label inside a violin

Curator’s Corner. History Perfected in the very late 17th century, the violin is the most ubiquitous antique object form in our daily lives. It is the principal melody instrument in symphony orchestras and mountain string bands. It has not been improved since the s when Stradivari, Guarnieri, Amati and a dozen others worked in Cremona, Italy. Fine violins were also made in England, France and Germany. Value: As everyone knows, the instruments made in Cremona fetch fabulous prices at auction. Everyone who finds an old violin thinks that he has a fortune in his hands because it generally has a Stradivarius label in it. It stands to reason.

The magic of the Stradivarius: the most beautiful violins in the world

Violins that meet the highest performance standards: Corilon violins presents its custom collection of old German, French and Italian violins and historic master violins. Please use our filter and sorting options. For many musicians, a violin is more than just an instrument.

See {81–84} for articles on dating violins through tree-ring analysis, and {} and {} for items on “fiddler’s neck,” and on jaw disease among violinists.

It is usually a case of the expert having years of contact with similar sorts of instruments in which the origin is actually known. That is why all experts at least the ones I have been fortunate enough to know tended to learn their trade under the guidance of an already established expert. I am by no means any sort of expert myself, although I have had sufficient contact with them over many years to have basic knowledge regarding the sorts of things they look at and do in order to determine origin.

Some of the knowledge too, would probably be better classified under the guise of “black art”. By that I mean there are many intangibles they look for that are much easier to visualise in one’s mind than put into express words. A picture is worth at least words. The more authentic violins someone has access to, the more they can visualise in their own minds the physical characteristics that identify them. To be honest, the label on a violin is the last thing a professional appraiser is going to look at during an evaluation in any case.

Or at least it should be. The presence of a label does help to confirm the opinion of an expert, certainly.

Violins | Antique violins

The following violins bring alive stories and lessons from the past. They are monuments to the family Amnon Weinstein never knew, and to the 6 million Holocaust victims who cannot speak for themselves. These instruments are like a forest of sound, violins that, when played, speak for all of them. These are the Violins of Hope.

Many even threatened to break or burn their instruments.

A violin soloist, Philippe Quint, played a thank you concert for the cabbies there after one returned his $4 million violin dating from , the.

Just the other day another Strings reader wrote inquiring about the value and authenticity of his violin. Even if the little tag inside your instrument is original, the information printed on it might be accurate but obscure, genuine but inaccurate, misleading, or downright false. A cursory investigation of the aforementioned Rocca label provides an illustration.

Using a few key words to search the Internet turned up several instruments bearing the same label. Among them, a genuine Joseph Rocca, certified by a famous dealer and sold by a reputable auction house. A second violin bearing the same label was made by John Lott, perhaps the best of the English makers. Whether or not to call them forgeries, rather than copies, is debatable, as forgery implies intent to deceive.

It was all over New York and had several attributions to Enrico Rocca Genoa , some from good people, to which I have no comment. In the end, it had just enough quality going for it that it sold to a dealer on spec that it was Enrico. As this one example illustrates, labels are hardly a reliable guide to identifying an instrument.

How old is your violin? Date it by analysing the growth rings in the wood.

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of the violins dating from before the time of its adoption with the neck, fingerboard and bass-bar as fitted by their makers. Another in- fluence of great importance.

Dendrochronology, which may be defined as the dating of the year-rings of wood, has only recently been employed in the dating of violins. In , Lottermoser and Meyer attempted a relative dating of Italian stringed instruments by comparing the year-ring patterns of three violins, though actual dating was not achieved until the s by Corona, Schweingruber, and Klein [1]. I met Dr. Klein many years before the Guarneri exhibition, for in the s and s, he was often invited to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to date panel paintings and other wooden objects.

In dating musical instruments for the Department of Musical Instruments including violins, viols, lutes, guitars, and harpsichords , I never had any reason to question his findings, which were always in agreement with my assessments regarding age and attribution. However, because of a dispute that developed during that session, he was unable to leave the Ashmolean with his measurements. Klein now declines to date violins, which is a great loss to those of us who formerly relied upon his expertise and objectivity.

Time to Tie a String Around That Strad

In its continuing mission to nurture the next generation of performing artists, the Ravinia Festival maintains an instrument bank through which it lends high-quality instruments to selected young professionals accepted into Ravinia’s Steans Music Institute. The first instrument acquired by the collection is a Carl Becker violin, which was presented to Ravinia in the fall of by the late Joseph Bernstein of Glencoe, the founding donor of the Instrument Bank.

Other violins are a Joseph and Antonio Gagliano instrument; one handcrafted by Joannes Tononi of Bologna, dating from circa ; and one made by Eugenio Degani of Venice, dating back to Three cellos complete the collection: one made in London by John Betts and dating from the period to ; another, also from London, the work of Richard Tobin dating from around ; and the third a Vuillaume dating from around Earlier that season, Mr.

Jul 16, – Explore Steve Truscott’s board “Violins”, followed by Violin Maker: Nicolò Amati (Cremona Cremona) Date: Geography: Cremona.

Sadly, this iPhone app for instantly discovering the age of a violin by visual analysis of the wood was an April Fool, but the principle of Dendrochronology is sound. Specialists use dendrochronology to find out the when the wood used in an instrument was grown. The history of a tree can be read in its rings, as year by year they reflect the climatic conditions. In a good year the tree will grow healthily and there will be a wide ring, in a colder or unusually dry year the ring will be narrower.

Trees of the same species growing in similar areas all have the exact same pattern. Precise measurements and computer analysis mean that the patterns in the spruce on the table of a violin of unknown age can now be compared with data from a wide range of other instruments. If you want a dendrochronological analysis to find out how old your violin is, contact Peter Ratcliff.

Cello bows.

First violins imitated human voices: study

Antonio Stradivari , Latin Stradivarius , born ? In Stradivari began to produce larger models, using a deeper-coloured varnish and experimenting with minute details in the form of the instrument. He also made some fine cellos and violas. The Stradivari method of violin making created a standard for subsequent times; he devised the modern form of the violin bridge and set the proportions of the modern violin, with its shallower body that yields a more powerful and penetrating tone than earlier violins.

Dendrochronology, which may be defined as the dating of the year-rings of wood, Klein now declines to date violins, which is a great loss to those of us who.

User Group Leader : Colin Harrison www. The Ashmolean museum Oxford currently presents violins and other instruments made by the famous instrument maker Stradivari and his disciples. Previous work suggested that a correlation of instrument age and wood density measured by NMR existed. MOLAB5 was called to perform contactless studies on wood density, composition and structure with depth resolution. Contrary to the common approach of creating a contrast parameter that divides the sum of the first echoes by the sum of all following echoes, a new approach based on Inverse Laplace analysis is used.

To this matter, the NMR signal decays at each depth were transformed by ILT into the components that compose the overall signal.

History of the violin

There are 3 additional images in the archive which are not available publicly. Please contact us for more information. Huggins, Margaret L. Cozio holds copies of many certificates and other documents, some of which are available to view on request. Please contact us if you wish to view a particular document.

A world record auction price for a violin was set at Christie’s in London last month​. The Stradivarius dated fetched £, But how much is that fiddle.

Music historians have long suspected that the inventors of the violin wanted to imitate the human voice, and a study out Monday shows how 16th to 18th century luthiers in Italy did it. Researchers at National Taiwan University asked a professional violinist to play 15 antique instruments, including one from by Andrea Amati, the early 16th-century luthier from Cremony, Italy who is considered to be the father of the modern four-string violin. Others played in the study were from the Stradivarius family, conceived by Antonio Stradivari, who improved upon Amati’s design.

First, researchers recorded scales played on the 15 antique instruments played by a professional violinist and recorded at Taiwan’s Chimei Museum. Then, they recorded the voices of eight men and eight women, ranging in age from 16 to 30 years, who sang common English vowels. Performing a thorough acoustic analysis, they found that an Amati violin dating to and a Gasparo da Salo violin dating to mimicked the basses and baritones of male singers, “raising the possibility that master violinmakers from this period may have designed violins to emulate male voices,” said the report.

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AshNMR – Effects of ageing on the wood and varnish of violins and violas

So why do musicians keep getting separated from their precious, often priceless instruments? The answer could be simply that they are mere mortals. But if that is the case, why does it not happen even more often, given that musicians travel constantly and haul everything along except the Steinway grand? Maybe the answer there lies in the extraordinary, even paranoid behavior that musicians display toward the tools of their trade.

The latest case of separation anxiety was highlighted last week at a taxi lot at Newark Liberty International Airport.

THE rarest antique instruments can sell for millions of pounds in high-profile auctions. Emma Yeomans meets the Hove expert whose analysis.

Music historians have long suspected that the inventors of the violin wanted to imitate the human voice, and a study out Monday shows how 16th to 18th century luthiers in Italy did it. Researchers at National Taiwan University asked a professional violinist to play 15 antique instruments, including one from by Andrea Amati, the early 16th-century luthier from Cremony, Italy who is considered to be the father of the modern four-string violin.

Others played in the study were from the Stradivarius family, conceived by Antonio Stradivari, who improved upon Amati’s design. First, researchers recorded scales played on the 15 antique instruments played by a professional violinist and recorded at Taiwan’s Chimei Museum. Then, they recorded the voices of eight men and eight women, ranging in age from 16 to 30 years, who sang common English vowels.

Performing a thorough acoustic analysis, they found that an Amati violin dating to and a Gasparo da Salo violin dating to mimicked the basses and baritones of male singers, “raising the possibility that master violinmakers from this period may have designed violins to emulate male voices,” said the report. The study is published in PNAS. Explore further. Your feedback will go directly to Science X editors. Thank you for taking your time to send in your valued opinion to Science X editors.

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